Posts tagged “The Negev

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The Negev: Ibex

Ibex

 

 


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The Negev: Cattle Egret

SONY DSC

 

 


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The Negev: Vulture in the Desert of Zin

Vulture in the Desert of Zin

 

 


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The Negev: Short Toed Eagles of Ain Avdat

Vultures

 

 


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The Negev: Makhtesh Ramon

Makhtesh Ramon

A makhtesh is a geological landform considered unique to the Negev desert of Israel. A makhtesh has steep walls of resistant rock surrounding a deep closed valley which is usually drained by a single wadi. The valleys have limited vegetation and soil, containing a variety of different colored rocks and diverse fauna and flora. The best known and largest makhtesh is Makhtesh Ramon.

 


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The Negev: Burning Bush, Manna, and Acacia Tree

Burning Bush, Manna, and Acacia Tree

Here, in this single photo, are three plants from the Exodus story, in the very desert were the Israelites wandered: the Burning Bush in the foreground, Manna to the left, and an Acacia Tree, behind.

 

 


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The Negev: Geological Dyke

Geological Dyke
Here, in the Negev Desert, his geologic dike, a flat body of rock that cuts through another type of rock in the center of the photo, is made of igneous rock formed after magma, the hot, semi-liquid substance that spews from volcanoes, cools and eventually becomes solid.

 


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The Negev: Khan Saharonim

Khan SaharonimFor hundreds of years beginning in the 3rd century BCE, great camel caravans trekked between the shores of the Arabian Peninsula to the Mediterranean port of Gaza carrying  spices and incense. Led by the Nabateans, an ancient Arab culture that grew rich from the trade until it was eventually conquered by the rapidly expanding Roman Empire, the spice route was famous for fueling the desires of the very empire that would eventually destroy it.

Khan Saharonim is the remains of  a roadside inn where the travelers would rest and recover from the day’s arduous journey before continuing . The ruins clearly show that this was one of the stops along the spice route where dozens would gather and camp together and regroup before moving forward in an effort to protect themselves from bandits hiding out in the desert.

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: The Guerilla Knitter Strikes

The Guerilla Knitter Strikes Loton

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Discovering Radish

Discovering Radish

SONY DSC

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Junk Bikes

Junk Bikes

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Fast Cooker

Fast CookerMiron making lunch

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Guitar Planter

Guitar Planter

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Compost Cat

Cat in the Compost

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Construction

How a Straw Bale Building is ConstructedHay bale construction at Kibbutz Lotan.

And the resulting home:

Loton Door

Alex's Son, Aman, with a student

Lotan residents designing a structure.


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Kibbutz Lotan: Miron

MironThis is Miron, an intern at the center for Creative Ecology at Kibbutz Lotan.

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan: Alex

Cousin AlexThis is Alex, the Director of the center for Creative Ecology (or something like that) at Kibbutz Lotan

 

 


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Kibbutz Lotan

Kibbutz Lotan is a Reform kibbutz in the Arabah Valley in the Negev desert in southern Israel. It was founded in 1983 by idealistic Israeli and American youths whom together built a profit sharing community based on pluralistic, egalitarian and creative Jewish values while protecting the environment. One of those youths was Karen’s cousin, Alex. No longer a youth, Alex is still committed to sustainable architecture and agriculture.

This is the welcoming chicken of Loton.

Kibbutz Lotan

 


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Timna: Acacia

Timna Acacia


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Timna: Miner’s Temple to Hathor

Miner's Temple to HathorThe Egyptian copper miners at Timna created this temple to the Goddess Hathor.


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Timna: King Solomon’s Pillars

King Solomon's Pillars


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Timna: Solomon’s Mine

Inside an Acient MineDavid, the GuideOur guide, David, preparing to go down into an ancient copper mine.


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Timna: Spiral Hill

Spiral Hill


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Ma’ale Aqrabbim

Ma'ale Aqrabbim